A Child Is Born

Available in Audiophile 96kHz/24bit

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
A Child Is Born 49:47 $17.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Angels We Have Heard on High 4:20 $2.49 Buy
2 A Child Is Born 3:40 $2.49 Buy
3 Imagining Gena at Sunrise 1:06 $2.49 Buy
4 Oh Come Oh Come Emmanuel (I) 7:28 96/24 Album only
5 Journey to Bethlehem 1:12 $2.49 Buy
6 We Three Kings 5:03 96/24 Album only
7 Little Drummer Boy 4:52 $2.49 Buy
8 God Is With Us 6:25 96/24 Album only
9 Amazing Grace 2:11 $2.49 Buy
10 Christmas Medley: Away in a Manger / What Child Is This / Silent Night 2:41 $2.49 Buy
11 Imagining Gena At Sunset 4:30 $2.49 Buy
12 Let Us Break Bread Together 0:28 $2.49 Buy
13 It Came Upon a Midnight Clear 4:55 $2.49 Buy
14 Oh Come Oh Come Emmanuel (II) 0:56 $2.49 Buy

Price as configured: $17.98

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THIS ALBUM DOWNLOAD FEATURES HIGH RESOLUTION COVER ART ONLY. LINER NOTES ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

A Child Is Born is the first Christmas recording from jazz pianist Geri Allen. Her third album for Motéma Music finds Allen exploring both traditional Christmas Carols and hymns. Immaculately performed, the deeply-personal album features her traditional stylings. This must-have holiday collection is packed with complex improvisations and adventurous melodies.

Reviews
"In concert with the Christmas Season, Motema Music has released GERI ALLEN: ˜A CHILD IS BORN' The rare Christmas record that transcends background music, nostalgia or pure business, this first Christmas album by the jazz pianist Geri Allen is serious and thoughtful. She rearranges songs like We Three Kings and It Came Upon a Midnight Clear for solo piano and other instruments including celesta and Farfisa organ, darkening them into unanswerable questions; in her hands, they sound influenced by late Coltrane, late-1960s Miles Davis and gospel music. She also weaves in under-a-minute snippets of multitracked improvisations and recorded segments of singing by theGee's Bend Quilters Collective, the Alabaman craftswomen." - BEN RATLIFF - The New York Times 11/25/11