Apologetica

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
Apologetica 51:29 $11.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 In Chains 03:31 $1.49 Buy
2 The Passing Of The Plumeria 05:59 $1.49 Buy
3 Totoka 04:16 $1.49 Buy
4 Instumental Interlude #1 00:47 $1.49 Buy
5 Lovely Bird 03:55 $1.49 Buy
6 Katun End 01:59 $1.49 Buy
7 Instrumental Interlude #2 00:58 $1.49 Buy
8 The Quetzal 04:04 $1.49 Buy
9 The Sea Shall Burn 06:00 $1.49 Buy
10 Instrumental Interlude #3 01:15 $1.49 Buy
11 The Breath 07:43 44.1/16 Album only
12 Instrumental Interlude #4 01:29 $1.49 Buy
13 No Sin 03:08 $1.49 Buy
14 Apologetica 06:25 $1.49 Buy

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In the library of a small Catholic college in Pennsylvania I found the complete Chilam Balam, the sacred books of the Maya Indians of Yucatan. The prophet Balam in his 15th century writings foretold of strangers from the east who would bring a new religion to the Maya. It was from these books that most of Apologetica's text was gleaned.

The choral-string piece Totoka (track 3) and the introducton to the song Lovely Bird (track 5) use texts created from mixing Hopi and Navajo words and phrases. Apologetica, the final work in this set of pieces uses a text drawn from The Tears of the Indians, a 1542 book by Fray Bartoleme de las Casas, the Spanish Bishop who was known as the Protector of the Indians.

Apologetica went through several incarnations before reaching its final form of 14 pieces -- ten songs and four instrumental interludes. The texts, created by Sheilah Britton and myself, are as true to the spirit of the original sources as possible.

The world premiere of Apologetica took place at St. Moritz Cathedral in Kromeriz, Czech Republic in June 1996 with Zdenka Vaculovicova conducting the Archbishop's Ensemble. Since that time there have been complete and excerpted performances innies and gelatinously impressionist orchestrations of Lentz's magnum opus will cause modernist sourpusses to write this off as New Age music. Wrong, wrong, wrong. Listen to the elision of words in the first movement, as "despair" in the men's voices blends into "This pair of eyes see" in the women's, and then "eyes see" merges with "My sea is red with our blood" in the men again. Add to that disarming text-setting approach Lentz's unobtrusively odd meters like 7/4 and 5/4 and his use of MIDI keyboards with string orchestra and chorus, and you've got a sumptuous but utterly original work, far stranger than it sounds. The poems, by Lentz and others, do homage to indigenous peoples killed by the Spanish, and the beauty is meant to heal and help mourn as well as soothe. If you can't hear the ori Kobe, Japan, the ISA's Drama City, and at Musica Visual Festival in Lanzarote, Canary Islands.

--Daniel Lentz

Reviews
"The gorgeous harmonies and gelatinously impressionist orchestrations of Lentz's magnum opus will cause modernist sourpusses to write this off as New Age music. Wrong, wrong, wrong. Listen to the elision of words in the first movement, as 'despair' in the men's voices blends into 'This pair of eyes see' in the women's, and then 'eyes see' merges with 'My sea is red with our blood' in the men again. Add to that disarming text-setting approach Lentz's unobtrusively odd meters like 7/4 and 5/4 and his use of MIDI keyboards with string orchestra and chorus, and you've got a sumptuous but utterly original work, far stranger than it sounds. The poems, by Lentz and others, do homage to indigenous peoples killed by the Spanish, and the beauty is meant to heal and help mourn as well as soothe. If you can't hear the originality through the caramel surfaces, clean your damn ears out. A PLUS" - Village Voice