Beggars Banquet (50th Anniversary Edition)

Available in Audiophile 192kHz/24bit & 96kHz/24bit

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
Beggars Banquet (50th Anniversary Edition) 0:39:46 $24.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Sympathy For The Devil (50th Anniversary Edition) 06:17 192/24 Album only
2 No Expectations (50th Anniversary Edition) 03:56 192/24 Album only
3 Dear Doctor (50th Anniversary Edition) 03:22 192/24 Album only
4 Parachute Woman (50th Anniversary Edition) 02:20 192/24 Album only
5 Jigsaw Puzzle (50th Anniversary Edition) 06:05 192/24 Album only
6 Street Fighting Man (50th Anniversary Edition) 03:15 192/24 Album only
7 Prodigal Son (50th Anniversary Edition) 02:51 192/24 Album only
8 Stray Cat Blues (50th Anniversary Edition) 04:37 192/24 Album only
9 Factory Girl (50th Anniversary Edition) 02:08 192/24 Album only
10 Salt Of The Earth (50th Anniversary Edition) 04:48 192/24 Album only

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℗ 2018 ABKCO Music & Records
© 2018 ABKCO Music & Records

THIS ALBUM DOWNLOAD FEATURES HIGH RESOLUTION COVER ART ONLY. LINER NOTES ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

The Rolling Stones Beggars Banquet (50th Anniversary Edition), was recorded between March and July of 1968 at Olympic Sound Studios in London, mixed at Sunset Sound in Los Angeles, Beggars Banquet was the first Stones album produced by Jimmy Miller, and marks the start of what is considered their most prolific album era. Beggars Banquet has a special place in the history of the band, as it is the final album completed with the original lineup of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts.

In the August 10, 1968 issue of Rolling Stone, magazine founder and editor Jann Wenner previewed the album for his readers noting, “The Rolling Stones have returned, and they are bringing back rock and roll with them. They have finished their next album — titled Beggars’ Banquet — and it is the best record they have yet done. In all aspects it is a great album; great Rolling Stones’ material and performance; a great rock and roll album, without pretense, an achievement of significance in both lyrics and music.” Wenner also put Mick on the cover of that issue, with a boastful headline, “The Stones Make the Great Comeback of Their Career.”

Long after its original release, legendary rock journalist and author Ben Fong-Torres heralded Beggars Banquet as “an album flush with masterful and growling instant classics” that “responds more to the chaos of ’68 and to themselves than to any fellow artists . . . the mood is one of dissolution and resignation, in the guise of a voice of ambivalent authority.”

As Fong-Torres refers to, “Street Fighting Man,” the most politically charged Stones song of all time, was partially inspired by Mick Jagger’s first-hand experience at an anti-war rally at the U.S. embassy in London where he saw activist Tariq Ali speak. Simultaneously, student protests in Paris were taking place, leading to a massive uprising that May in which almost a quarter of the nation participated in strikes and demonstrations. Jagger told Rolling Stone in 1997, “It was a very strange time in France. But not only in France but also in America, because of the Vietnam War and these endless disruptions . . . I thought it was a very good thing at the time. There was all this violence going on. I mean, they almost toppled the government in France . . .”

February 1969 marked the album’s second single, “Sympathy for the Devil” written mainly by Jagger after Marianne Faithfull gave him a copy of Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel The Master and Margarita. The story follows the devil as he visits Stalin-era Soviet Union. Originally intended to be played in a folk style, Richards suggested changing the tempo and adding percussion, turning the rhythm into a samba. The evolution of this incredible song was captured in the Jean-Luc Godard film Sympathy For The Devil aka ONE PLUS ONE.

The original intended album cover art for Beggars Banquet was initially rejected both by London Records, their U.S. label as well as Decca, their UK label. The Michael Vosse photograph of a vandalized restroom wall (Jagger and Richards provided the graffiti, the restroom was inside a Porsche dealership) was deemed offensive, possibly because the top of an open toilet is captured in the shot. The replacement cover was simply the band name and album title written in the style of a wedding invitation, and remained that way for several years before the intended bathroom photo art was no longer perceived as offensive, and finally gained its rightful place on the cover.