Stravinsky: Le sacre du printemps

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Stravinsky: Le sacre du printemps 1:15:33 $17.98
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# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": I. Introduction 3:23 44.1/24 Album only
2 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": II. Les Augures printaniers 1:21 44.1/24 Album only
3 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": III. Danses des adolescents 1:53 44.1/24 Album only
4 Le sacre du Printemps, Pt. 1 "L'Adoration de la Terre": IV. Jeu du rapt 1:18 44.1/24 Album only
5 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": V. Rondes printani 3:35 44.1/24 Album only
6 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": VI. Jeux des cit 1:52 44.1/24 Album only
7 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": VII. Cort 0:41 44.1/24 Album only
8 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": VIII. Le Sage 0:23 44.1/24 Album only
9 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 1 "L'adoration de la terre": IX. Danse de la terre 1:09 44.1/24 Album only
10 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 2 "Le sacrifice": I. Introduction 4:34 44.1/24 Album only
11 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 2 "Le sacrifice": II. Cercles myst 3:09 44.1/24 Album only
12 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 2 "Le sacrifice": III. Glorification de l' 1:36 44.1/24 Album only
13 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 2 "Le sacrifice": IV. Evocation des anc 0:41 44.1/24 Album only
14 Le sacre du printemps, Pt. 2 "Le sacrifice": V. Action rituelle des anc 3:34 44.1/24 Album only
15 Le Sacre du printemps, Pt. 2 "Le sacrifice": VI. Danse sacrale (L'Elue) 4:45 44.1/24 Album only
16 Symphonies of Wind Instruments 9:47 44.1/24 Album only
17 Apollon musagète: Premier Tableau (Prologue) - Naissance d’Apollon 5:30 44.1/24 Album only
18 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Variation d'Apollon: Apollon et les Muses 3:05 44.1/24 Album only
19 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Pas d'action: Apollon et les trois Muses 4:25 44.1/24 Album only
20 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Variation de Calliope 1:32 44.1/24 Album only
21 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Variation de Polymnie 1:13 44.1/24 Album only
22 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Variation de Terpsichore 1:41 44.1/24 Album only
23 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Variation d'Apollon 2:40 44.1/24 Album only
24 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Pas de deux: Apollon et Terpsichore 3:59 44.1/24 Album only
25 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Coda: Apollon et les Muses 3:31 44.1/24 Album only
26 Apollon musagète: Second Tableau - Apothéose 3:51 44.1/24 Album only

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Sir Simon Rattle, conducting the
Berliner Philharmoniker

From the included liner notes by Marina Frolova-Walker

Early last century, ambitious young composers knew that the creation of an original style was one of the preconditions for success. Stravinsky joined their number in 1911, when his eminently original Petrushka was staged, but instead of celebrating his achievement in a series of works exploring this new idiom, he moved on, startling audiences over the next decade with an astounding succession of equally original new styles. Just as Petrushka could not have been predicted on the basis of The Firebird, no one could have guessed that the Rite of Spring could have followed just two years after Petrushka. Then again, who could have imagined that after the thudding, spasmodic and terrifying Rite, Stravinsky would end the decade with the dainty, quirky Pulcinella. The only parallel in the art-world was Picasso, and both were recognised around the world as figureheads for modernism, or, perhaps we should say ‘modernisms’, that successively delighted and dismayed each wave of followers.

Stravinsky found a perfect match in Diaghilev’s Ballets russes. Not only did it provide the perfect environment for his talents (confounding the doubts of fellow composers), but he also proved to be the only composer who could always fulfil Diaghilev’s permanent demand: ‘Astonish me!’ It was in this hothouse of experimentation that the Rite was born.