Dmitry Shostakovich Complete Symphonies Vol. 10: Symphonies No. 15 and 3

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
Dmitry Shostakovich Complete Symphonies Vol. 10: Symphonies No. 15 and 3 1:04:00 $17.98
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# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Symphony No. 15 op. 141: Allegretto 7:28 $2.49 Buy
2 Symphony No. 15 op. 141: Adagio 13:52 88/24 Album only
3 Symphony No. 15 op. 141: Allegretto 4:04 $2.49 Buy
4 Symphony No. 15 op. 141: Adagio - Allegretto 12:48 88/24 Album only
5 Symphony No. 3 "May Day" op. 20: Allegretto 3:37 $2.49 Buy
6 Symphony No. 3 "May Day" op. 20: 17 - Piu mosso 5:06 $2.49 Buy
7 Symphony No. 3 "May Day" op. 20: 44 - Andante 4:07 $2.49 Buy
8 Symphony No. 3 "May Day" op. 20: 52 - Allegro 6:06 $2.49 Buy
9 Symphony No. 3 "May Day" op. 20: 89 - Largo 2:27 $2.49 Buy
10 Symphony No. 3 "May Day" op. 20: 98 - Moderato 4:25 $2.49 Buy

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Symphonic Panorama
The next-to-last release in the complete edition of Dmitry
Shostakovich’s symphonies on MDG traces the
customary development from the wildness of youth to
maturity. In his Symphony No. 3 the twenty-three-yearold
composer paid homage to May First as an important
symbol of the revolution; forty-two years later in his
Symphony No. 15, his last such work, he seems to have
wanted to recall the carefree years of his youth. The
dazzlingly arrayed Beethoven Orchestra of Bonn under
the conductor Roman Kofman presents this symphonic
panorama to us together with the Czech Philharmonic
Choir of Brno.
Bright Future
The young Shostakovich, like many of his
contemporaries, regarded the October Revolution as “the
spring of humanity,” as Pravda put it. When he
composed his Symphony No. 3 in 1929 and dedicated it
to May First, his music reflected the pure joy that he then
felt while contemplating the bright future that communism
held in store.
Later Fate
After political reality had repeatedly brought
Shostakovich to the verge of despair, he concluded his
symphonic oeuvre in 1971 with a “light-hearted little
symphony” with some autobiographical elements. He
himself called the first allegretto his “toy shop” and filled it
with brass parodies and other effects. Things are not so
light-hearted in the second movement, in which
Shostakovich’s forebodings of death can already be
detected. This movement is followed by a short scherzo with a fragmentary twelve-tone row and then by the
finale, which begins with the fate motif from Wagner’s
Ring des Nibelungen and also contains other melodic
allusions from the music world.