George Rochberg: Music for the Magic Theater

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
George Rochberg: Music for the Magic Theater 49:21 $11.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Music for the Magic Theater: Act I 9:04 44.1/16 Album only
2 Music for The Magic Theater: Act II 8:06 44.1/16 Album only
3 Music for the Magic Theater: Act III 9:44 44.1/16 Album only
4 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Declamando, tragico 1:11 $1.49 Buy
5 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Largo; recitando 0:54 $1.49 Buy
6 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Tranquillo; flessibile; rubato molto 1:07 $1.49 Buy
7 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Allegro marziale; rigoroso 2:10 $1.49 Buy
8 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Adagio molto - Tempo primo 4:58 $1.49 Buy
9 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Lento; tranquillo 2:28 $1.49 Buy
10 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Cadenza (horn and violin) 0:53 $1.49 Buy
11 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Cadenza (flute and viola) 1:05 $1.49 Buy
12 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Cadenza (clarinet and cello) 1:41 $1.49 Buy
13 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Molto adagio 3:50 $1.49 Buy
14 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Allegro marziale; rigoroso 0:56 $1.49 Buy
15 Octet; A Grand Fantasia-Largo, recitando 1:14 $1.49 Buy

Price as configured: $11.98

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“I understood it all. I understood Mozart, and somewhere behind me I heard his ghastly laughter.” George Rochberg (b. 1918) cites this passage from Hermann Hesse’s Steppenwolf as a backdrop for his Music for the Magic Theater, for fifteen players. The central theme in the book—a magic theater meshes reality and fantasy, past and future, in search of new apertures to a living present—inspired Rochberg to embrace “a kind of sound-collage in which the past and present are quite literally juxtaposed.”

Rochberg summons a wide variety of composers, including Mozart, Beethoven, Mahler, Webern, Varèse, Stockhausen, Miles Davis, and of course Rochberg himself. Despite sharp contrasts and what some may take for a complete absence of logic, Rochberg combines his materials in such a manner as to suggest their inevitable association in a dreamscape that is paradoxically anchored and realistic.

In his Octet; A Grand Fantasia, Rochberg adopts the traditional ensemble of mixed strings and wind octet, dating from the time of Schubert, and designates the work a “Grand Fantasia” to emphasize formal freedom and transformation of melodic content.