I Want To Hold Your Hand

Available in Audiophile 192kHz/24bit & 96kHz/24bit

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
I Want To Hold Your Hand 41:30 $17.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 I Want To Hold Your Hand 7:23 96/24 Album only
2 Speak Low 7:14 96/24 Album only
3 Stella By Starlight 6:29 96/24 Album only
4 Corcovado (Quiet Nights) 5:59 96/24 Album only
5 This Could Be The Start Of Something 7:08 96/24 Album only
6 At Long Last Love 7:17 96/24 Album only

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℗ © 2013 Blue Note Records

THIS ALBUM DOWNLOAD FEATURES HIGH RESOLUTION COVER ART ONLY. LINER NOTES ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

Grant Green (guitar)
Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone)
Larry Young (organ)
Elvin Jones (drums)

Recorded March 31, 1965 in Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ

Produced by Alfred Lion

Originally released as Blue Note BLP 4202 (mono) and BST 84202 (stereo)

"In preparing these hi def remasters, we were very conscientious about maintaining the feel of the original releases while adding a previously unattainable transparency and depth. It now sounds like you've set up your chaise lounge right in the middle of Rudy Van Gelder's studio!" - Blue Note President, Don Was.

The third of three sessions Grant Green co-led with modal organist Larry Young and Coltrane drummer Elvin Jones, I Want to Hold Your Hand continues in the soft, easy style of its predecessor, Street of Dreams (also available as an HDTracks download). This time, however -- as one might guess from the title and cover photo -- the flavor is less reflective and more romantic and outwardly engaging. Part of the reason is tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, who takes vibe player Bobby Hutcherson's place accompanying the core trio. His breathy, sensuous warmth keeps the album simmering at a low boil, and some of the repertoire helps as well, mixing romantic ballad standards (often associated with vocalists) and gently undulating bossa novas. The title track -- yes, the Beatles tune -- is one of the latter, cleverly adapted and arranged into perfectly viable jazz that suits Green's elegant touch with pop standards; the other bossa nova, Jobim's "Corcovado," is given a wonderfully caressing treatment. Even with all the straightforward pop overtones of much of the material, the quartet's playing is still very subtly advanced, both in its rhythmic interaction and the soloists' harmonic choices. Whether augmented by an extra voice or sticking to the basic trio format, the Green/Young/Jones team produced some of the most sophisticated organ/guitar combo music ever waxed, and I Want to Hold Your Hand is the loveliest of the bunch.