Juju

Available in Audiophile 192kHz/24bit & 96kHz/24bit

Buy Album
Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
Juju 42:15 $24.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Juju 8:35 192/24 Album only
2 Deluge 6:53 192/24 Album only
3 House Of Jade 6:53 192/24 Album only
4 Mahjong 7:44 192/24 Album only
5 Yes Or No 6:39 192/24 Album only
6 Twelve More Bars to Go 5:31 192/24 Album only

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© ℗ 2013 Blue Note Records

THIS ALBUM DOWNLOAD FEATURES HIGH RESOLUTION COVER ART ONLY. LINER NOTES ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone)
McCoy Tyner (piano)
Reggie Workman (bass)
Elvin Jones (drums)

Recorded August 3, 1964 in Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ

Produced by Alfred Lion

Originally released as Blue Note BLP 4182 (mono) and BST 84182 (stereo)

"In preparing these hi def remasters, we were very conscientious about maintaining the feel of the original releases while adding a previously unattainable transparency and depth. It now sounds like you've set up your chaise lounge right in the middle of Rudy Van Gelder's studio!" - Blue Note President, Don Was.

Juju is Wayne Shorter's 1964 classic. Within this undeniable masterwork, the influences of John Coltrane are evident. The recording, his second as a bandleader for Blue Note Records, highlights his unmatched virtuosity. Performing with artistic sensitivity, the album features pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Reginald Workman and drummer Elvin Jones. This is the same rhythm section Coltrane utilized for his 1961 album Africa/Brass. The quartet not only showcases their thrilling chemistry but also their riveting solo talents, performing Shorter originals including "House Of Jade," "Mahjong," "Juju" and many more. The album is an essential document of Wayne Shorter's compositional genius.


Reviews
...Shorter's improvisations, hypnotic in their effect, were contained in compositions with harmonies so interesting that he virtually never lapsed into the boredom that many Coltrane disciples, and Coltrane himself sometimes did in pieces with simplified harmonic structures. - JazzTimes