Moments In Time

Available in Audiophile 192kHz/24bit, 96kHz/24bit, DSD 2.8MHz & DSD 5.6MHz

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
Moments In Time 01:04:52 $24.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Summer Night 09:12 192/24 Album only
2 O Grande Amor 06:44 192/24 Album only
3 Infant Eyes 07:41 192/24 Album only
4 The Cry of the Wild Goose 08:10 192/24 Album only
5 Peace 06:10 192/24 Album only
6 Con Alma 12:34 192/24 Album only
7 Prelude to a Kiss 05:41 192/24 Album only
8 Morning Star 08:40 192/24 Album only

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℗ 2016 2xHD - Naxos
© 2016 2xHD - Naxos

This never-before-released music recorded in 1976 at San Francisco’s Keystone Korner Features the Stan Getz Quartet with tenor saxophonist Stan Getz and his rhythm section of pianist Joanne Brackeen, bassist Clint Houston and drummer Billy Hart.

Journalist Ted Panken describes Moments in Time as capturing the artists on this recording as a "unit of thirty-something masters-in-the-making." Keystone's producer Barkan recalls: "Stan explained to me quite a few times backstage at Keystone Korner that 'I have never felt as free and as totally supported as I do with this band with Joanne Brackeen, Clint Houston, and Billy Hart. They are happy and free to go with me wherever I go . . .'" Barkan relates that Getz frequently told him that he felt the most comfortable at the famed San Francisco club, more than he did at any other club.

Pianist Brackeen, talks about playing with Getz in her interview with Feldman: "I think that it kind of really displays the quartet at its best, which we rapidly became and stayed. And he had to be really daring to hire us. He already had his thing. He was already famous. He didn't have to have this band. And this band was crazy! I mean, we would do anything and everything we possibly could. We weren't just there as accompaniments . . . And then you hear how he played on it, it's so lyrical. He doesn't play one note that he doesn't mean. At any time. That's the one thing I guess that I would say about him that was so unique to me. And he also talked that way, when he was speaking."

 

Saxophonist Joshua Redman pays homage to Getz: "His virtuosity — he could play any tune in any key at any tempo, with command and control and a sense of relaxation." And he further celebrates Getz's". . . incredible storytelling ability — the natural, organic logic in the flow of his phrases and ideas."


Reviews

Dave Gelly, The Observer

Stan Getz: Moments in Time review – wonderfully exciting –by

4 Stars

Then approaching 50, Getz had left his suave, cool-school approach far behind, and with a fresh, energetic young band was attracting a new generation of admirers. Pianist Joanne Brackeen is outstanding. Her wide-ranging solos clearly inspire Getz to produce some wonderfully urgent and exciting improvisations, notably on Wayne Shorter’s composition Infant Eyes. Getz remarked at the time that he had never felt as free and “totally supported” as he did with Brackeen, bassist Clint Houston and drummer Billy Hart.”

 

John Fordham, The Guardian

A unique encounter with the sax master -

4 Stars

Poetic swing-era saxophonist Stan Getz, a genius with a tone soft enough to make purring cats sound harsh, is typecast by his chilled-out 1960s jazz samba hits. But he was a brilliant swing-to-bebop improviser in the right setting. This previously unreleased 1976 set from San Francisco’s Keystone Korner takes him outside his comfort zone with the unfamiliar trio of pianist Joanne Brackeen, bassist Clint Houston and drummer Billy Hart. Wayne Shorter’s Infant Eyes and Kenny Wheeler’s Latin-funky The Cry of the Wild Goose are among its eight covers, and Getz sounds as free as the wind despite the daunting post-bop unpredictability of his partners. Infant Eyes features shimmering hoots and transported ascents from Getz, with a solo of swirls and playful pirouettes from Brackeen. Getz the balladeer is masterly in Horace Silver’s Peace and Prelude to a Kiss, and he gallops with relish through Dizzy Gillespie’s Con Alma. A unique jazz encounter...