Mozart Bassoon Concerto No 1 And Flute And Harp Concerto

Available in 44.1kHz/16bit

Buy Album
Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
Mozart Bassoon Concerto No 1 And Flute And Harp Concerto 1:09:41 $11.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 K313 First Movement (Flute Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 8:35 44.1/16 Album only
2 K313 SecondMovement (Flute Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 8:52 44.1/16 Album only
3 K313 ThirdMovement (Flute Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 7:35 44.1/16 Album only
4 K.191 First Movement (Bassoon Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 6:46 $1.49 Buy
5 K.191 SecondMovement (Bassoon Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 6:23 $1.49 Buy
6 K.191 ThridMovement (Bassoon Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 4:18 $1.49 Buy
7 K.229 First Movement (Flute And Harp Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 9:55 44.1/16 Album only
8 K.229 Second Movement (Flute And Harp Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 7:33 44.1/16 Album only
9 K.229 ThirdMovement (Flute And Harp Concerto) [The Chamber Orchestra Of Europe] 9:44 44.1/16 Album only

Price as configured: $11.98

* Required Fields

MOZART Flute Concerto No. 1, in G, K 313. Bassoon Concerto in B♭, K 191.1 Flute and Harp Concerto in C, K 299 • Thierry Fischer (fl), cond; Matthew Wilkie (bn); Charlotte Sprenkels (hp); Sandor Vegh, cond;1 CO of Europe • COE 813 (69:12)


Reviews
"Every time I get a CD of Mozart concertos to review, I feel a pang of irritation. Not because I dislike Mozart; quite the contrary, he is one of my favorite composers. The problem with Mozart is that his work is so well known, such a staple in the repertoire, that the sheer amount of recordings has created a market saturation. Competition is fierce, indeed. In the case of the flute concertos, for instance, I can cite by heart three stunning recent recordings by Jacques Zoon (Telarc), Patrick Gallois (Naxos), and Emmanuel Pahud (EMI), not to speak of the many others available. The dozens of versions have established a standard of performance that varies very little. One recording of a Mozart flute concerto is not much different from another, in terms of tempos, for example, or character. And there is good reason for that. Decades of experience have crystallized the ideal tempo, the ideal gestures. It would make no sense to choose a different tempo just for originality's sake. That would be like tampering with the recipe for spaghetti al sugo: tradition makes it perfect, not invention.