New Music for Baritone & Chamber Ensemble

Available in 44.1kHz/16bit

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
New Music for Baritone & Chamber Ensemble 59:29 $11.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Luminescence: I 7:13 44.1/16 Album only
2 Luminescence: II 6:59 44.1/16 Album only
3 Luminescence: III 3:47 44.1/16 Album only
4 Canto: Cinco 2:22 44.1/16 Album only
5 Canto: Atardecer en el Tropico 3:42 $1.49 Buy
6 Canto: Cancion de Cuna 2:36 44.1/16 Album only
7 Canto: Epitalamio 4:03 $1.49 Buy
8 Canto: XXIV 1:35 44.1/16 Album only
9 Conceptuality/Life 27:12 44.1/16 Album only

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© ℗ 2007 Mutable Music

THIS ALBUM DOWNLOAD FEATURES HIGH RESOLUTION COVER ART ONLY. LINER NOTES ARE NOT AVAILABLE.

Performers:
S.E.M Ensemble, conducted by Petr Kotik
Continuum, conducted by Joel Sachs
Thomas Buckner, baritone

New Music for Baritone & Chamber Ensemble contains pieces written specifically for Thomas Buckner by Annea Lockwood (Luminescence), Tania Leon (Canto), and Petr Kotik (Conceptuality/Life). All three works take advantage of Buckner's vast experience as an experimental vocalist, as well as the capable talents of the S.E.M. Ensemble and Continuum.

Lockwood's composition is based on eight poems by Etel Adnan, taken from Sea and is a celebration of the friendship between Lockwood, Adnan, and Buckner. Canto is a song cycle for baritone and mixed ensemble, and is a "diaspora of images in words." Petr Kotik takes on the role of both composer and conductor for the final piece on the album, Conceptuality/Life. The piece is organized by pre-arranging individual sections of the work and does not use a traditional score.

Reviews
Although all of the pieces presented on New Music hold their own, Conceptuality/Life is in particular a feat of orchestral architecture. It builds in a desultory-yet-sensuous wander over its first 20 minutes, then locks into something like a miniaturized variation on Morton Feldman's long-winded orchestral grind. That's a lot of territory to cover in an hour. If factionalism in classical music is your thing, this may not be the album for you.