SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphonies Nos. 1 and 6

Available in Audiophile 88kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit

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Album Name Length Format Sample Rate Price
SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphonies Nos. 1 and 6 1:07:46 $11.98
Buy Individual Tracks
# Track Title Length Format Sample Rate Price
1 Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10: I. Allegretto - Allegro non troppo 8:46 44.1/16 Album only
2 Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10: II. Allegro 5:24 $1.49 Buy
3 Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10: III. Lento - Largo 10:02 44.1/16 Album only
4 Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10: IV. Allegro molto - Largo - Piu mosso - Presto 10:37 44.1/16 Album only
5 Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 54: I. Largo 20:16 44.1/16 Album only
6 Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 54: II. Allegro 5:23 $1.49 Buy
7 Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 54: III. Presto 7:18 44.1/16 Album only

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In 2006, as it celebrates the 250th Birthday of Amadeus Mozart, the world seems to have forgotten that other world famous composers also celebrate important jubilees this year. One of these is the Russian composer Dmitry Shostakovich, born 100 years ago in St. Petersburg; a true musical anarchist who, at the age of 13, studied piano at the Petrograd Conservatory (under Leonid Nikolajew) and composition (under Maximilian Steinberg). For many years his creative artistic freedom was threatened and endangered by the soviet deskbound bureaucrats He fell under their calculating glare twice, once in 1936 and again in1948. The result was a remarkably ambiguous attitude of the composer. In the then current system he developed a sort of dual personality (although in reality Shostakovich never actually suffered under such a clinical problem). On the one hand the composer outwardly functioned and obeyed the socialist system but inwardly he undertook a personal emigration. He only confided this true attitude to his music. And because the party functionaries understood little from music, his choice was a good one.

Reviews
"On Vladimir Jurowski's disc, the orchestra seems to understand the Shostakovich First and Sixth Symphonies through and through, though the conductor prefers to keep the darker truths in the background, treating the First Symphony almost like one of Stravinsky's chic, neoclassic ballets. That's one way to look at the music, and he does so convincingly." - David Patrick Stearns, Philadelphia Inquirer